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Being three dimensional in a two-dimensional world

Being three dimensional in a two-dimensional world

Imagine for a moment that you’re giving a presentation or speaking one-on-one with someone about a topic that interests you, and you suddenly realize everything you’re saying is going unheard. You look back at blank stares, or at a personal gaze aimed anywhere but into your own eyes.

Perhaps you have something vitally important to post on your favorite social media site — some insight you’ve worked really hard to achieve, or a poignant moment to reveal — and you craft a pithy post, only to have it go virtually unseen or overwhelmed by the latest political blather, crude joke or pet pic.
Is there wisdom in the world that would probably benefit each of us? Of course. Are more and more of us seeking something more than a flat, banal and reasonably safe slide through life? I hope so….
I’ve been fascinated for a long time at the general malaise, apathy and what’s recently been called the “low information” aspect of politics. We have so much information available these days: why is the general polarization of politics getting more and more snarky and less and less “informed?” I imagine a similar fragmentation of religion back in the day, where theology simply wasn’t discussed in “polite company.” Mainstream religions fractured into factions anyhow, and God help you if you were even seen with “those other people” who belonged to “that other church.”
Is there some kind of safety in choosing not to ask the hard questions? Does it feel more secure to just accept some things on faith — religious or political or personal — and throw in with others who do, too? Does strength in numbers really serve us when so many of us, quite possibly, no longer think for ourselves? Stock market and real estate “bubbles” that burst are painful and recent examples of the cycles of collective awareness: things are looking up, then things are looking down.
Does mass consciousness really matter? Sure; it’s comfortable to leave the heavy lifting to others, but how does that serve you if you are part of the mass?
Example: If you are one of the few who made a lot of money trading stocks or real estate, you are also by definition out ahead of the collective awareness — willing to think boldly before everyone else took the hint and began glomming on. In one sense, you might have been a leader, particularly if you used your early adoption to help inform others of their potential. You would have helped to shape mass consciousness. Sadly, you may have also been the brunt of the backlash when the bubble of mass consciousness burst — part of the 1% that the 99% love to hate.
Even more tragic, you might be one who profits by making certain that “victims” (eg those who lost it in the crash) remain victimized. Think of those who are invested in making sure the downtrodden don’t have a chance, in keeping a subservient populace “in their place,” in profiteering from oppressing others. History is full of them.
Just like the financial 1%, there are 1% leaders in religion, politics, science and many other fields. I’m not talking about the 0.0001% (or less) who are tyrants. I’m focussed on the folks who aren’t afraid to ask the tough questions, even if it means shaking the foundations of what 99% of us rely upon. These are the thought leaders willing to risk upsetting the two-dimensional apple cart of boom and bust, light and dark, good and bad — willing to posit a third dimension where opposites aren’t the only choices. These are the folks whose social media posts go virtually unnoticed. These are the folks with the quietly bruised egos. These are the people who simply must think and investigate and research and share their ideas, even though many times there’s no one in the room to hear them.
Someday when you have time, read up on “the commons,” or “alternative currency” for some insight on economic thought leadership today. Take a look at how micro lending is transforming third world economies. Check out organizations like The Heifer Project, that was using “pay it forward” long before that notion became a movie script.
If religion is your thing, Rabbi Michael Lerner might interest you. Or search for “redefining religion” and read what you see. There are reasons the traditional ways of faith and fellowship are morphing: we believers are starting to be aware that two dimensional thinking no longer serves us well enough…we want God to give us more than just “the old time religion.” The polarization of religion between peaceful worship and killing infidels in the name of one’s beliefs is shocking today…and it always has been. Faith can no longer be blind.
Fascinated by science? Read the research by Rupert Sheldrake. Or venture to the edge of matter with physicist Maria Spiropulu.
If you are already living at the boundary of what you used to accept on faith in whatever realm of endeavor holds meaning for you, then welcome to the paradox where opposites no longer attract. As you open up to the third dimension, even while you continue to live in the world of opposites, be aware that those around you whom you love dearly and are still thinking in two dimensions will offer you…ridicule, disdain, mockery and — worst of all — silence. But not to worry…
…there’s a chance — a small one — that you could find a home on the three-dimensional map of the new universe. You might even find others willing to gaze across to your place from theirs, maybe even notice you there in your new enlightened aloneness. You’re in great company…but most of those who’ve dared to boldly go there before you are, sadly, dead: Columbus, Galileo, Martin Luther King, Ghandi, Joan of Arc, Martin Luther himself, Mohammed, the gentlemen who signed on to America’s Declaration of Independence for example…it’s not a bad crowd, really….
Perhaps we will recognize one another out there in that unknown. I hope so. You may not be able to see me, but I expect you’ll hear music. I will probably be close by.

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